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Onto-Med >> Theories >> GFO Part I Basic Principles

 
   

6.2 Processes

Processes have temporal parts and thus cannot be present at a time-point. Time belongs to them, because they occur over time and the time of a process is built into it. The relation between a process and a chronoid is determined by the projection function $\Gprt$. There are two additional projection relations, one of them projecting a process, $p$, to a temporal part of the framing chronoid of $p$. The second relation $\Gprt(p,c,q)$, should to be understood as follows: $p$ is a process, $c$ is a temporal part of the chronoid that frames $p$, and $q$ is the part of $p$ that results from the projection of $p$ onto $c$. That means, $q$ can be seen as the restriction of the process $p$ to the sub-chronoid $c$. The temporal parts of a process $p$ - which are captured by the temporal parthood relation extended to processes, denoted $\Gprocpart(x, y)$ - are exactly the projections of $p$ onto the temporal parts of the framing chronoid of $p$. The third relation projects processes onto time-boundaries; we denote this relation as $\Gprb(p,t,e)$, and call the entity $e$, which is the result of this projection, the boundary of $p$ at $t$. We postulate that the projection of a process to a time-boundary is a presential. Moreover, presentials depend on processes, since they cannot exist without being a part of the boundary of some process.

Robert Hoehndorf 2006-10-18
 
       
     
     
     

   
     
     
       
 

deutsch   imise uni-leipzig ifi dep-of-formal-concepts